Oct 242013
 

When baby boomers like myself gather together and talk photography, we often lament the demise of SLR cameras in terms of their size and weight. As we get older, the appeal of lugging a DSLR and the lenses to cover all photographic eventualities becomes less and less; some of us can no longer cope with such a weight of photographic equipment because of health concerns.

When Olympus announced the retro OM-D EM-5 last year, it caused considerable interest among us oldies, many of whom cut their photographic teeth with the original Olympus OM-1. But the OM-D is a micro four-thirds camera and we want what we had in the past, namely full-frame capability but without the accompanying bulk.

I have long failed to understand why camera manufacturers seemed reluctant to offer a full-frame DSLR based on the design of the old SLR cameras.

If rumor is to be believed, it appears Nikon are about to step up to the plate and offer a DSLR based on the classic Nikon FM2 design.

New Nikon camera rumored to be based on the Nikon FM2

Return of a classic? Picture courtesy of Nikon Rumors

I can imagine many older Nikon shooters are salivating at the prospect.

I have never shot with a Nikon but started my journalism career when the press camera of choice was always a Nikon. When I had to replace my gear following a burglary, I toyed with the idea of going with Nikon but the Minolta XD-7 offered more bangs for the buck and also felt better in my hands. I had been shooting with a Minolta SRT 303 for several years previously. If only Minolta were still in business. I am sure they would have already delivered what a great many photographers want in a camera.

According to Nikon Rumors, the new Nikon will feature:

 Nikon FM2 design

16.2MP 36 x 23.9 full-frame sensor, the same as the D4

2016-pixel RGB image sensor

Expeed 3 processor

Native ISO range: 100-12,800 (incl. ISO 50 and ISO 108,200)

9-cell framing grid display

3D color matrix metering II

Standard F mount

3.2″ LCD screen

Pentaprism viewfinder

5.5 fps for up to 100 shots

SD memory card

Battery: EN-EL14

Weight: 765g

Dimensions: 143.5 x 110 x 66.5mm

It will come with a new AF-S Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G lens

NO video capability

The last point is particularly pleasing. A great many older photographers could happily live without the video capability that is seen as a vital ingredient of DSLR cameras these days.

Mark Dubovoy writing for Luminous Landscape states:

Many photographers who are not interested in video (present company included) are beginning to get quite annoyed at the concept of convergence because it burdens them with additional complexity in their cameras with a series of functions and buttons that are completely unnecessary for still photography.

“To make matters worse, often times the video functions spell disaster in terms of accidental activation and battery consumption, as well as compromises that result in bad ergonomics for still photography. It can also make the cameras and lenses more expensive because of additional design work; buttons, dials and electronics; additional software; more expensive focusing or zoom motors for lenses; etc.”

I am glad to see that I am not alone in wanting a camera that does not include video capability. If that view makes me a photography dinosaur then so be it.

It would appear the message expressed by many older photographers has finally gotten through to at least one major camera manufacturer and here is me thinking only Ricoh designed cameras with photographers in mind.

An announcement about the new Nikon is expected in the first week of November, with November 6 being touted as a possible date.

Will Nikon go where others have feared to tread? It looks to be that way.

Feb 242012
 

I seem to be going through something of a stressful period at the moment and one thing I have learned in life is that too much stress and worry curbs creativity, at least when it comes to writing. It also makes you forgetful.

Two days ago, I suddenly thought back to my last trip to St Marys, Georgia, on February 4, and wondered why I hadn’t posted any of the photographs. Simple answer — I had never gotten round to processing them.

Canon 40D and Zeiss Planar T* ZE 1,4/50. ©Calvin Palmer 2012. All Rights Reserved.

On the camera front, the Canon 5D Mark III or 5DX will be announced in four days time if the rumours are to be believed. I think it is fairly clear Canon does have a replacement for its 5D Mark II in the pipeline but I will only believe it when I see it or details of it. Fingers crossed that it is next Tuesday.

Olympus has answered the plea I made in my last post by announcing the OM-D EM-5 camera and it has been well received by digital photography pundits and photographers. Based on the film camera classic, the OM-4 SLR, it is naturally small and compact but like its predecessor has a system of lenses built around it. That system is also destined to grow in the future. And of course, it can avail itself of the lenses produced by Panasonic for its Micro Four Thirds cameras.

I could easily be tempted by the M.Zuiko ED 12mm f/2,  M.Zuiko ED 45mm f/1.8 and Leica DG Summilux 25mm f/1.4 ASPH Micro Four Thirds lenses, which would give a kit comprising the equivalent of 24mm, 50mm and 90mm focal lengths in 35mm format.

A lot of people have been waxing lyrical about the Olympus OM-D, saying it is the future of photography and people will be abandoning their DSLR cameras in droves. However, with a lot of those camera sages, it seems to be a question of do as I say and not do as I do. For some strange and inexplicable reason, they all hang on to their full-frame DSLRs. I wonder why?

Canon 40D and Zeiss Planar T* ZE 1,4/50. ©Calvin Palmer 2012. All Rights Reserved.

Tempted as I am by the size, capability and lenses of the OM-D, I am afraid I have reservations about the Micro Four Thirds format and size of sensor. I know the sensors of the latest cameras are head and shoulders above those of the early variants of this system but I am old school and firmly believe that sensor size does matter. Yes, APS-C sensors of today can match the full-frame sensors of a camera introduced three years ago in terms of picture quality, at least that is the boast of the Sony NEX.

But isn’t it logical that the latest incarnation of the older camera — the Canon 5D Mark III or Canon 5DX — is likely to show similar improvements in image quality and raise the bar again?

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