Dec 162011
 

The Sony NEX-7 received its review from Digital Photography Review, the place where loud obnoxious people like to pretend they are professional photographers, without offering a shred of evidence to support their claim, and pour scorn on the images submitted by enthusiasts, particularly those owning Leica M9 cameras. I doubt a true professional photographer, certainly not the ones I have known, would conduct themselves in such a manner.

This week, dpreview gave the Sony NEX-7, the latest offering in the new breed of mirrorless cameras, a huge thumbs up. The reviews by dpreview provide a useful yardstick in assessing a camera, although the fan-boys of various camera manufactures regard its words as gospel.

The review by dpreview is a good source of reference and an instant port of call for anyone wishing to know the specifications of the 24MP APS-C CMOS sensor Sony NEX-7.

I found an article by working professional photographer Peter Sills far greater benefit along with the hands-on experience of esteemed photographer and photoblogger, Michael Reichmann at his Luminous Landscape Web site.

Sills took his copy of the NEX-7 with him on a trip to Cuba. He also took along his trusty workhorse, the Canon 5D Mk II. Sills shot with both cameras but increasingly favoured the smaller Sony over the Canon.

The Sony came into its own for taking candid photographs in situations where the larger Canon would become too noticeable and kill the moment.

Sills concludes:

I am now totally convinced that the future of digital photography will incorporate high-quality EVF in almost all cameras. This is just the beginning of this technology. Also, the need for the large SLR may also be starting to end. Given the capabilities of the new mirror less cameras, I see no reason for overly large bodies (except that they can currently support much larger batteries).

I am already planning my return trip to Cuba. The country is a photographer’s dream. My Canon gear will be staying at home.

Over at Luminous Landscape, Reichmann has just concluded a rolling review of the Sony NEX-7, even to the extent of comparing its resolution with the Leica M9.

Reichmann concludes:

The NEX-7 is the most exciting camera that I’ve had the pleasure of using in the past five years.

Praise indeed and Reichmann then goes on to list the NEX-7 features that impressed him the most.

I have to admit the NEX-7 has aroused my interest, partly because of its size but more importantly because of the link between Sony and Carl Zeiss lenses. Zeiss has already produced one E-mount lens for the NEX range of cameras, a 24mm/f/1.8, which is the equivalent of the 36mm lens in 35 mm format because of the Sony’s 1.5 crop factor. I expect other Zeiss lenses will follow. The NEX-7/Zeiss 24mm lens combination will set you back $2199.98 and is not expected to be readily available until January.

Interestingly enough, B&H has the Canon EOS 5D Mk II body on offer for $1995.99. The price also includes a 16GB Sandisk Extremem Pro CF card, Lowepro Adventura 170 Shoulder Bag & Red Giant B&H Video Production Software Bundle ($719.85 Total Value) .

Until the NEX-7, the only mirrorless camera that appealed to me was the Ricoh GXR, mainly because I am familiar with Ricoh cameras and also Ricoh boasts the one of the best UIF for photographers.

The NEX-7, however, has one distinct advantage over Ricoh’s GXR, the in-built EVF. I find the thought of having to attach an electronic viewfinder to the hot-shoe of the GXR offputting and, besides, the NEX viewfinder far surpasses the Ricoh one in terms of image quality.

My great hope is that Ricoh responds to the NEX by producing a GXR II with a comparable in-built EVF. I would much prefer a Ricoh offering and the A12 m-mount affords the opportunity to mount manual Zeiss lenses. Ricoh also trumps the Sony camera when it comes to the customization of camera settings. The NEX at present allows no customized settings.

At the moment it is all academic to me but I like to keep my eye on future camera options.

I am not sure I would agree with Sills’ assertion that the DSLR is about to become extinct. I can see how people who own a DSLR for family snaps may find the compact and lighter mirrorless cameras more to their liking. I can see professional photographers whose genre is street photography favouring something like the NEX-7 but in terms of press, sports and fashion photography, a high-end DSLR will always reign supreme.

Reports of the death of the DSLR are greatly exaggerated, to paraphrase Mark Twain.

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Apr 272011
 

Digitial Photography Review, more usually referred to as DPReview, recently had a poll on the question: What should we call mirrorless cameras?

Mirrorless cameras are cameras such as the Panasonic Lumix G models, Olympus Pen Digital models, Sony NEX and Samsung NX series.

DPReview prefaced the poll with this introduction:

Just what should we call mirrorless cameras? Ever since the launch of the Micro Four Thirds System, the photographic world has struggled to find a satisfactory generic term to describe similar systems. The current front-runners appear to be “mirrorless” or “compact system cameras” but there is nothing like consensus yet. We have put some of the more common options and some alternatives we have had suggested to us, in a poll to see how you think of these cameras. It is a chance to have your voice heard, since we have had more than one camera maker ask us which name is most widely recognized. So have a look to the right of this story and register your vote.

If the cameras are called mirrorless cameras, why do they need a new name? It seems the photographic world did not struggle too much to come up with the term mirrorless camera. With this poll, DPReview has simply instigated an exercise in redundancy.

But the geeks and techno-freaks want something to chatter about, anything rather than take photographs – the sole purpose of a camera. No, these people would rather spend hours debating the merits of a CCD sensor versus a CMOS sensor. And of course everyone who posts on DPReview is an “expert”.

The trouble with DPReview is that it takes itself far too seriously. It is essentially an amateur production that cashed in on the Internet explosion and all credit to them for doing that. But where is its authority? It doesn’t really have any since it was never put to the marketplace in the same way that print publications are.

The preface to the poll would be a little more credible if it named the camera manufacturers that see DPReview as the font of all knowledge. Are camera manufacturers facing such hard times that they no longer have marketing departments or cannot afford to hire a marketing consultant to find out the answer?

I guess there is nothing wrong with self-inflating one’s ego. It certainly hasn’t done Donald Trump any harm.

If DPReview is so all-knowing and speaks for the camera industry, why has it never reviewed the Ricoh GR Digital III camera? DPReview does seem to have an inherent bias against Ricoh cameras and likes to play its favourites – another reason to level the charge of amateurism.

The results of the poll are now in.

The winner was Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera with 45.2 percent of the vote, a total of 14,392 votes; second place went to Interchangeable Lens Compact with 18.6 percent, 5,920 votes.

One wag on a DPReview forum noted his disappointment, I would guess tongue-in-cheek, that the poll did not have Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Format as one of the voting options.

I think that comment was the only good thing to emerge from this exercise in futility.

Boys and their toys, huh?