Jul 192012
 

My photographic productivity tends to ebb when the temperature soars above 90 degrees (32 degrees C) in Northeast Florida, as it has done for the past three weeks. Extreme heat has the same effect on me as extreme cold – I want to stay indoors.

In the absence of any indoor photographic projects or a studio setup, I eventually have to get out and brave the hot and humid conditions. I usually wait until after 4:00 pm and limit myself to an hour, 90 minutes at most, shooting time.

I recently went across the St Johns River and explored the South Riverwalk of Jacksonville. One of the main attractions on the south side of the river is the renovated Friendship Fountain.

Canon 40D and Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro. ©Calvin Palmer 2012. All Rights Reserved.

As an indication of how hot I get, when it came to having a cigarette before heading home, my cigarette packet, which is carried in my shirt pocket, was damp to the touch. Luckily, the cigarettes remained dry.

Nik Software’s Viveza 2 has become the latest addition to my photographic software and it brings to my colour photographs the same degree of control and enhancement achieved by Silver Efex Pro 2 in my B&W shots. It doesn’t have quite all the bells and whistles of Silver Efex Pro 2 and I would imagine Viveza 3 is in the pipeline.

Canon 40D and Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro. ©Calvin Palmer 2012. All Rights Reserved.

I have been extremely pleased with Viveza 2 and have no hesitation in recommending it. I know the Photoshop purists will say similar results can be achieved in Photoshop but not with the same kind of ease and convenience.

Canon 40D and Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro. ©Calvin Palmer 2012. All Rights Reserved.

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May 172012
 

Last week’s announcement of the Leica M9- Monochrom camera sparked off the Leica bug in me again. Whereas the new camera with its dedicated B&W sensor does not hold all that much appeal, despite my love of B&W photography and the great many images that I convert to B&W, I would still want the colour option in any camera that I might own.

Award winning photographer Edmond Terakopian has had the chance to put the Leica M9-M through its paces and without a doubt the results are mightily impressive.

I have seen some people say that they will now carry two Leicas, the M9 and the M9-M, citing the days of film when they carried two cameras – one loaded with colour film and one with black & white film. In those days, there was little option but to carry two cameras if you wished to shoot both colour and b&w shots but digital photography has freed photographers from that constraint or should I say burden. People are strange.

Canon 40D and Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro. ©Calvin Palmer 2012. All Rights Reserved.

The Leica M9 prompts the old head versus heart dilemma in me. The head tells me that in terms of value for money far better cameras than the M9 are to be had. Who in their right mind would pay nearly $7,000 for a camera that boasts a 230,000 dot LCD screen, no AF capability, no live view and a top ISO of 2500?

The heart tells me that the Leica M9 offers unsurpassed full-frame image quality and one only has to look at images shot by skilled photographers to see that they have an image quality often referred to as the “Leica look”.

Factor in the weight of the M9, a mere 585g or 20.64oz, and its size — 139 x 80 x 37 mm or 5.47 x 3.15 x 1.46 ins – and suddenly the heart appears to be winning the argument.

The Canon and Nikon fanboys on DPReview take great delight in slagging off the Leica M9 as an overpriced under-featured camera, the plaything of doctors, dentists and lawyers who can afford the Leica price tag.

I would hazard a guess that many of those same fanboys have no direct experience of film SLR photography and are digital through and through. When they rant and rail against the Leica M9, as they often do, they are missing the point and one that came to me in a moment of epiphany after reading Thorsten Overgaard’s treatise on the Leica M9.

Leica is the only camera manufacturer that made a seamless transition from film cameras to digital ones. It kept the size, shape and form of the Leica M film cameras but gave them a digital heart. Thus those shooting film with a Leica M could switch to a Leica M8 and later M9 with a relatively shallow learning curve and without having an extra pound or two added to the weight of the camera.

For more than 25 years I shot with a Minolta XD-7 SLR camera, known as the Minolta XD-11 in the United States, which weighed 560 g or 19.75 oz and measured 136mm x 86 x 51mm or 5.35 x 3.38 x 2.01ins. My Canon 40D weighs in at 822 g or 29.0 oz and measures 146 x 108 x 74mm or 5.75 x 4.25 x 2.91ins and without the luxury of a being full frame. To achieve comparable performance with the Minolta, I would have to look at the Canon 5D Mark III, all 33.51 oz of it, or the 48.85-oz Canon 1Ds Mark III.

It is easy to see why so many photographers of my generation would love their Minolta XD-7, Nikon FE or Canon AE-1 fitted with a digital sensor. Those people who used to shoot with a Lecia M3, M4, M5 or M6 got exactly that with a Leica M9.

We can also cope with manual focus lenses and centre-weighted metering because that is how we learned our craft. AF is a convenient option but not an essential one if a camera has focusing aids in the viewfinder, which the Leica M9 has unlike the Canon models mentioned above. That being said, I still manage to focus manual Zeiss ZE lenses on my Canon 40D. Admittedly , it is a lot harder than focusing with the Minolta but it is still achievable.

Back in my film days, I kind of negated the weight benefits of the Minolta XD-7 by shooting with a 70-210 mm zoom lense. With age has come wisdom and the decision to only shoot with prime lenses. My days of lugging heavy camera equipment are long gone. If I miss a photo opportunity because of the focal length of the lens on the camera, so be it. I am no longer answerable to the demands of a picture editor. I shoot what I want to shoot.

Leafing through Thorsten Overgaard’s guide to the Leica M9 and reading how he shoots with it – set aperture priority, ISO at 200, manually focus on the subject and fire the shutter – reminded me of shooting with the Minolta XD-7, even down to the centre-weighted metering. And in a Road-to-Damascus moment, I could see the obvious appeal of the Leica M9 and why so many photographers value it so highly.

I think with a Leica M9, two or three Zeiss ZM lenses and possibly the Voigtlander Nokton 35mm f/1.2 lens, I would be set up for life. With my Minolta XD-7, I never experienced a moment of camera lust because I had what I considered to be the best camera for my photographic needs. I think the same would hold true for the Leica M9.

The only problem with using Zeiss ZM lenses is that they are not 6-bit coded. I am not sure how much of a disadvantage that would be, especially since I would shoot RAW rather than JPEG. And by not using Leica lenses, I probably wouldn’t achieve that 100 per cent Leica look but I think I would get close enough for my tastes.

Canon 40D and Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro. ©Calvin Palmer 2012. All Rights Reserved.

All that remains is to find the several thousand dollars it will take to make a photographic dream come true. I have already checked out a couple of secondhand Leica M9s to reduce the potential outlay, one of them being the M9-P, which appeals because of its understated appearance – it doesn’t carry the red dot or M9 motif – but, more importantly, because of the virtually unbreakable sapphire crystal covering on the LCD screen. This camera would be the last one that I would ever buy, so I would want it to last in good condition for as long as possible.

With that all settled, I am off to buy a lottery ticket or two. Wish me luck!

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Mar 302012
 

I took delivery of a Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM lens last Thursday, my first autofocus lens. I had planned to shoot with it quite a bit this week but unfortunately I was laid low with a viral infection that can best be described as 48-hour flu. I am over the worst of it but its effects are lingering on in the form of feeling listless and lethargic. I did manage to get out and about at the weekend and was mightily pleased with the results.

Canon 40D and Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro. ©Calvin Palmer 2012. All Rights Reserved.

Using an AF lens has involved a learning curve for me, albeit not a steep one. I am using back button focus, a method I read about a while back and considered by many to be preferable to half pressing the shutter to achieve focus. My thumb has quickly learned the position of the AE Lock button and I must say I enjoy this method of shooting. It did involve making a couple of adjustments to the Custom Functions of the Canon 40D and I have also set one of the camera settings C1 to shooting with AF.

When I go back to my trusty manual focus Zeiss Planar T*, I will simply switch back to Av mode.

Canon 40D and Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro. ©Calvin Palmer 2012. All Rights Reserved.

A few weeks ago on this blog I was lamenting the way that camera manufacturers do not seem to cater to the wishes of photographers like me by producing the digital equivalent of the Nikon F2, Nikon FM, Canon AE-1, Minolta XD7 or Pentax K1000.

My photographic friend Bob, in England, echoed my thoughts when we were corresponding about the specifications of the new Canon 5D Mark III.

Bob wrote:

It all seems so far removed from my type of photography (and I use the latter word to describe the whole exercise/experience in the field). The phrase “great quality sound” just about sums it up. How have we managed to get to the point where these three words apply to a Single Lens Reflex camera!!! If this were an old-fashioned letter, this would be the point at which my pencil broke on the page.

I wonder if anyone will ever take something like a Pentax Spotmatic F as a model, simply put a sensor where the film plane used to be, bung some elementary digital electronic gubbins and a battery where the film/cannister was and market it as the “Jurassodigimatic”. Race you to the front of the queue.

Bob is a down-to-earth Lancastrian who has been photographing for more than 40 years. He specializes in landscape photography, industrial photography and railway photography, particularly steam locomotives. His work has been published in British steam railway enthusiast magazines. His approach to photography often involves meticulous planning and the use of a tripod and is diametrically opposed to my journalist on-the-fly hand-held approach.

Imagine my surprise this morning when I read an interview with one of my favourite contemporary photographers, David Burnett, on The Online Photographer Web site. I admire Burnett’s reportage work immensely and he also comes across as a genuinely nice guy.

While the kindergarten classes on DPReview are arguing the merits of the Canon 5D Mk III versus the Nikon D800, Burnett is still shooting with a pair of the original Canon 5D cameras. To Burnett, and any self-respecting professional photographer, cameras are simply tools. It is how those tools are used that separates the men from the boys.

Canon 40D and Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro. ©Calvin Palmer 2012. All Rights Reserved.

Burnett admitted that he does not own a digital camera capable of shooting at 100,000 ISO but did say that he had recently acquired a Leica M9 and went on to extol the virtues of rangefinder photography.

Burnett said:

I have been quite amazed, actually, that neither Canon nor Nikon has come out with their own re-creation of one of their classic rangefinder cameras. In all the advances in photo technology, it just surprises me that none of the traditional makers other than Leica (the preeminent) has seen fit to create a camera (please, no harping about the Epson) which recreates all those great 1950s cameras.

The interview garnered plenty of comments, many from young photographers admiring Burnett’s work. As befitting the man, he added a comment to the interview, acknowledging those kind comments.

He went on to say:

My issue with the RFDR cameras is take a Nikon D700/Canon5D chip (proven, capable, cheap) put it in a new SPdigi, CanonP/7 digi body, put a screen on the back as good as any $400 point/shoot (there are plenty), and PUT A FRICKEN RANGEFINDER with an M mount on the body. It’s not rocket science though perhaps it’s being seen that way. God bless all the x100/X-Pro1, Sony 5NEX, etc., etc., etc. cameras. Let them all fight for the wannabe crowd but make a $1500 RFDR body, (no need for video, let it just be a PHOTO camera) and you will be a) Camera of the Year; b) unable to keep up with demand; and c) loved by a very loveable group of shooters.

On reading that, I immediately thought of Bob’s e-mail and my own wish for a digital version of the great SLRs of the 1960s and 1970s.

Of course, it begs the question as to why major camera manufacturers will not produce such a camera but continue to produce the behemoths that full-frame DSLR cameras have become and why a generation of photographers, those of us 45 years and plus, is being ignored by the camera giants.

Over to you Canon, Nikon, et al!

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Jan 302012
 

In the days of film photography, I was always more circumspect when it came to deciding when to press the shutter and capture an image.  With the film and developing costing money, I was always strived to try and get value for my money. I didn’t always succeed.

With the advent of digital photography, once a memory card has been bought, whether you shoot 10 frames or 1,000, the operating cost is the same. I am not factoring in the cost of a camera, computer and the software needed to process the images. On a day-to-day basis of shooting photographs, digital photography is essentially free.

The downside to that situation is the tendency to shoot a lot more images, followed by a much longer process of deciding which are keepers and which can be deleted.

Canon 40D and Zeiss Planar T* ZE 1,4/50. ©Calvin Palmer 2012. All Rights Reserved.

Nikon guru and photography sage Thom Hogan, what Thom doesn’t know about Nikon cameras isn’t worth knowing, advocates limiting the number of images shot in an attempt to reduce the processing workflow.

In article about dealing with lots of digital images, Thom even harks back to the days of film and advises photographers to wrap each memory card in a 20-dollar bill to remind themselves that images cost money. He recommends “chimping”, looking at the images just after they have been shot and deleting the failures.

On the computer, Thom advises classifying the images into three categories — winners; keepers; and delete. He then further classifies the first two categories into winners, stock and keepers. Thom rates the winners with five stars; stock images with three stars; and keepers with one star. The three rankings correspond to Galen Rowell’s ABC system of classification: A for winners; B for stock; C for keepers.

Winners — five-stars or A —  are few and far between. Thom writes:

You don’t have very many. Ansel Adams once said that if you shoot a dozen great images a year, you’re doing well. If your A category gets much higher than a 100 images over a few years of shooting, you’re probably not being critical enough.

Three-star or B images are those sold for stock. Thom defines images in this category as “a very publishable and it’s an image that I’m proud to have my name associated with”.

One-star or C images are basically reference photographs. Thom defines them as “images that someone would find publishable, but you wouldn’t care if your name was or wasn’t associated with them.”

Renowned Danish photographer Thorsten Overgaard, a man whose photographs regularly grace some of the most presitigious publications in the world, takes a  somewhat different approach. Thorsten advises never to delete anything and certainly not on the basis of reviewing the image on the camera’s LCD screen. For Thorsten time is more costly than hard drive space.

At the computer, Thorsten recommends reviewing a shoot backwards when trying to determine the merits of the various images shot. By the end of a shoot the creative process is likely in full flow and better images will result than at the beginning. In Thorsten’s words you are “warmed up”. He adopts a binary system of classification. Either an image is one worthy of saving or it is not and even the latter are not deleted, they just become images that he does not spend time on.

Thorsten writes:

Hence you only have yes and no images. You don’t rate images with 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 stars. You either select it as an image or disregard it. You harvest images.

He marks his yes images with three stars. Those are the images he works on and eventually exports as high resolution JPEGs. His “harvest” will consist of “two, five, 10 or 14 images that are in fact professional”.

Thorsten concludes:

You may show your two, five, ten or fourteen images to people. And they will recognize that you have talent, because they have never met anyone who could make ten pictures that were all that perfect!

The emphasis must always be on quality when it comes to selecting images. I know at times that my quality control regarding what I post on various blog sites is not all that it should be. I kind of made a rod for my own back by starting a blog site called Tägliches Foto, which requires me to post a photograph every single day.

My method of sorting and selecting images consists of several stages. When shooting with the Canon 40D and the manual focus Zeiss lens, my initial selection is based on the image with the sharpest focus. This step involves using the loupe in Adobe Bridge and comparing several images of the same subject.  The image with the sharpest focus is marked with one star.

I then review all the one-star images and more in keeping with Thorsten’s approach make a selection on yes and no. The former are marked with two stars and these are the images I will spend time working on. During the course of processing the RAW images in Photoshop CS5 and Silver Efex Pro 2, I usually come to the conclusion that some of the two-star images are not really worth spending time on. They remain as two-star images while the processed ones become three-star JPEGs.

With the Ricoh GRD III, I mark all the RAW files with one star. I do wish Ricoh would facilitate the ability to just shoot in RAW rather than providing RAW plus a JPEG image. I then choose those that are worth working on and mark them with two-stars. As with the Canon, the two-star list is not definitive at this stage and some two-star images fail to make it as three-star JPEGs.

When it comes to deleting. When I have processed all the images from a shoot with the Canon, I delete those RAW files that were not quite in focus but i retain all the rest. With the Ricoh GRD III, I eventually delete the in-camera JPEG images.

When it comes to deciding which photographs will eventually appear on Calvin Palmer Photography, the choice is made from the three-star JPEGs and those selected are designated with four-stars.

The important thing to remember is succintly put by Thorsten: “No photographer has a hit rate of 100 per cent.”

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Jan 132012
 

Canon 40D and Zeiss Planar T* ZE 1,4/50. ©Calvin Palmer 2012. All Rights Reserved.

Over the holiday period I seemed to accumulate a lot of images that are still awaiting processing. The backlog is partly explained by the acquisition of new software — Photoshop CS5 and Silver Efex Pro 2 — and the learning curve associated with them.

On Wednesday, I happened to notice this American Sycamore leaf on the back deck and it struck a chord. I think it was a mixture of the angle of the leaf against the legs of a wooden table and the muted brown colour from Nature’s wonderful palette. I went back inside to fetch the Canon 40D and so record my first image of 2012.

I posted a B&W version on another of my Web sites — Tägliches Foto.

I am still wrestling with the issue of where I move next with regard to upgrading my photographic gear. At the moment I am sticking with the Canon 40D and hoping for an announcement in March regarding the Canon 5D Mk III. I remember being in the same position this time last year when those “in the know” — don’t make me laugh — were predicting an announcement in March 2011. Well, it didn’t happen and I am not holding my breath on the Canon 5D Mark III.

As the saying goes — All things come to he who waits.

I like the idea of the Ricoh GXR and an assortment of M-mount lenses. In fact, I tracked down two secondhand lenses — an M-Rokkor Minolta 28mm f/2.8 and Leica Summicron 40mm f/2 — at a fraction of the cost ZM lenses would cost, if you could get hold of them. But I still have my doubts about working with an EVF and one that is attached to the camera rather than being an integral part of the camera body. Besides, like Zeiss ZM lenses, the GXR A12 M-mount is also hard to come by. Ah the joys of supply and demand.

Checking out the specifications of hoped for photographic acquisitions is all very well — it would be foolish to embark on expenditure of a couple of thousand dollars without doing research — but photography is not about lens availability and camera specifications. It is about photographs and too many people seem to forget this fundamental fact.

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Nov 182011
 

My time at the moment is being spent going through countless images I have shot to select suitable one for submission to various photographic contests. It is an arduous task. I have great difficulty in narrowing the selection to just a few photographs and also trying to second guess just what it is the judges are looking for.

A lot of shots have had to be discounted from one of the contests because the rules state that I must have a model release for anyone who is recognizable. I wonder if Henri Cartier-Bresson obtained model releases for all his subjects photographed on the street that have since become classic examples of street photography.

The following shots were taken in Charlotte, North Carolina. I am not saying any of them are worth submitting but they are all disbarred. I have no model releases for any of the persons depicted.

Canon 40D and Zeiss Planar T* ZE 1,4/50. ©Calvin Palmer 2011. All Rights Reserved.

Canon 40D and Zeiss Planar T* ZE 1,4/50. ©Calvin Palmer 2011. All Rights Reserved.

 

Canon 40D and Zeiss Planar T* ZE 1,4/50. ©Calvin Palmer 2011. All Rights Reserved.

Canon 40D and Zeiss Planar T* ZE 1,4/50. ©Calvin Palmer 2011. All Rights Reserved.

I guess the organizers are just covering their backs, probably a wise precaution in the litigious land that is the United States. And maybe I am getting old and forgetting that back in my newspaper days, any photographs used for publication had to have a caption bearing the names of the people appearing in the image, unless it was a generic crowd shot.

Back to selecting images. Having seen some of those already submitted by other photographers, I fear I am probably wasting my time. Their images are so damned good. They are Barcelona to my Stoke City. Still, England did beat world champions Spain, albeit in a friendly match. I get the distinct impression that the competition in these photography contests is unlikely to be friendly.

I shall adopt the Olympic spirit — “The important thing is not to win, but to take part”.

With the holiday season coming up and Christmas just a few weeks away, the prints for sale at Calvin Palmer Photography would make ideal presents. Click on the link at the top of this page.

Nov 102011
 

I spent a couple of days in Charlotte last week. I had better rephrase that. I spent a couple of days visiting Charlotte, North Carolina, last week. The fall colours seemed more striking than those in Florida. Or maybe it was just my imagination.

Canon 40D and Zeiss Planar T* ZE 1,4/50. ©Calvin Palmer 2011. All Rights Reserved.

 

Canon 40D and Zeiss Planar T* ZE 1,4/50. ©Calvin Palmer 2011. All Rights Reserved.

So I was walking along W 4th Street in downtown Charlotte minding my own business. I had my camera bag slung from my shoulder and my Canon 40D hanging from my neck read to be brought up to my eye at a moment’s notice if I happened to see something worth capturing.

The building to my right caught my interest. It was a two-storey building that dated from the late 19th century or early 20th century at a guess. It was one of the few old buildings to have survived Charlotte’s renaissance in the 1970s to become the second largest financial centre in the United States. Many fine old buildings were torn down to make way for the towers of concrete, steel and glass, the cathedrals dedicated to the worship of Mammon.

This surviving old building had a colonnade façade, with large Georgian-style windows in between the rectangular columns. The repeated pattern had obvious photographic possibilities.

I walked on and wondered what the building’s function was. As I approached the gated entrance with a security booth, I noticed a sign that said “US Government Property.”

I had just passed by the security booth when a voice called out, “Excuse me, sir!”

I stopped and turned in the direction of the voice and saw a burly African-American man dressed in a blue blazer, shirt and tie, and grey slacks.

“What are you doing?” the man asked.

“Walking along this street,” I replied.

“What’s with the camera?” he enquired.

With an exasperated look, I said “Has it come to the point where a person with a camera can no longer walk along a street without being stopped.”

“This a federal court building,” he said.

That explanation may have struck a chord with an American but it was lost on me.

“What are you doing?” he said for the second time.

“I am just walking around looking for things to photograph. I was quite taken by this building but when I saw it was US Government Property, I thought it was probably a good idea not to take a photograph.”

“Could I see some photo ID?”

“You know you have no right to ask that. I am on a public street.”

The man smiled benignly but the smile did not mask a look of insistence.

I reached inside my jacket pocket for my wallet and opened it up.

“I tell you what,” I said. “You can have my business card instead. Perhaps you would like to buy a couple of my photographs.”

He studied my card, the one that appears at the top right-hand side of this page.

“Okay, Mr Palmer. Have a nice day.”

“I will try,” I said laconically and walked away. By this time something had caught my eye on the other side of the road and I crossed to take the shot.

Some hours later back at my hotel, I told my wife about the incident. She said that photographing outside federal court buildings was prohibited. At least it was up until October 2010 when, following a lawsuit filed by the New York Civil Liberties Union, the federal government recognized the public’s right to take photographs and record videos in public spaces outside federal courthouses throughout the nation.

The ruling also applies to all federal buildings throughout the nation.

Obviously, it takes longer than 12 months for news of legal rulings to get from Brooklyn to Charlotte.

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Oct 272011
 

Saturday sees one of the biggest rivalries in college football when the Georgia Bulldogs travel to the Everbank Stadium in Jacksonville to take on the Florida Gators.

I spotted the emblems of the two teams reflected in windows of the Baywater Square Building on East Bay Street.

Canon 40D and Zeiss Planar T* ZE 1,4/50. ©Calvin Palmer 2011. All Rights Reserved.

I can never understand the American interest in college football but a lot of people prefer it to the professional NFL games. College football’s popularity is helped by the games being played on a Saturday, while the most of the NFL games are played on Sunday.

I doubt whether people would flock to watch Manchester University’s soccer team on a Saturday afternoon instead of watching either Manchester United or Manchester City.

I also fail to understand how people who are not alumni of a particular  American university can get so enthusiastic about the fortunes of its football team. But it happens. Even people who left school at 18 will have their favourite college team. In Florida, the choice is between the University of Florida, better known as the Gators, and Florida State University, otherwise known as the Seminoles.

From Jacksonville’s point of view, the annual Georgia v Florida game is a big money earner. Downtown Jacksonville will be awash with people instead of its normal ghost-town demeanour and the bars along East Bay Street, pictured below,  will be primed for business.

Canon 40D and Zeiss Planar T* ZE 1,4/50. ©Calvin Palmer 2011. All Rights Reserved.

British readers may be confused as to why I wrote Georgia v Florida when the game is being played in Jacksonville, Florida. For reasons best known to itself, American football always gives the away side first. Don’t ask me why. I guess it is just another way in which America has to do things different, or should I say the opposite, from the rest of the world.

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Oct 172011
 

Yesterday, for the first time since I acquired my Canon 40D, I experienced the battery running out. Usually, I am meticulous at checking the battery’s status but somehow it got overlooked before I set out. Luckily, I managed to fire off a couple of dozen shots before I reached the point where I pressed the shutter and nothing happened.

Zeiss Planar T* 1,4/50 ZE and Canon 40D. ©Calvin Palmer 2011. All Rights Reserved.

Why did this oversight occur? Well, my mind has been in a state of flux these past couple of weeks as a result of medical issues, proposed life-changing ventures, which seem somewhat ill-conceived to say the least, as well as the realization that this web site and also the Calvin Palmer Photography web site may cease to exist in a few weeks when the registration and hosting fees become due for renewal.

You may ask why I did not carry a spare battery.  I never do. The battery in the Canon 40D is capable of lasting for a couple of days of shooting. And, like I said, usually I monitor the level of the battery pretty much in the same way I monitor the fuel gauge on my car. It just goes to show how worries and concerns can prove to be a major distraction.

The above shot features what was originally the Lynch Building on E Forsyth Street, Jacksonville. It is now an apartment complex and known as 11 East Forsyth.

The building dates from 1926 and was designed in the Chicago skyscraper style by architects Pringle & Smith. It originally housed commerical offices and was opened by film pioneer Stephen Andrew Lynch. When it opened it was Jacksonville’s second tallest building behind the Barnett National Bank Building.

In 1962, the building was renovated and became the headquarters of the American Heritage Life Insurance Company until it moved away from Jacksonville in the 1980s.

The building opened as an apartment complex in 2003 following a $24 million re-development and financial assistance from the City of Jacksonville.

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Sep 072011
 

I met the law on my last photographic safari, in the shape of an attractive and pleasant female police officer. I had ventured into Mixon Town, an old industrial and business area. Many of the premises are abandoned and consequently the area affords plenty of photographic opportunities.

Canon 40D and Zeiss Planar T* ZE 1,4/50. ©Calvin Palmer 2011. All Rights Reserved.

The site of my car parked in front of one of these vacant buildings naturally aroused the suspicion of the police officer. When I saw the police car parked by my car, I thought it only right to abandon my photography and make my presence known.

Satisfied that everything was as it should be, the police officer and I engaged in a lengthy conversation about Jacksonville and its crime problems. At the end, I asked if I could take a photograph.

Canon 40D and Zeiss Planar T* ZE 1,4/50. ©Calvin Palmer 2011. All Rights Reserved.

Sad to say, after our lengthy chat, I had switched off from photography mode. I should have done better in terms of the composition but my priority was to get the focus spot on and composition went out of the window. Oh well, better luck next time.

In our discussion about crime and the area I was in, I was told that it was not the place to venture into after dark. I was also made aware that as the owner of an Infiniti G35, I made a good target for carjackers. That possibility had never crossed my mind. I felt like the proverbial innocent abroad, which I suppose I am in some respects.

The officer also suggested, seeing as I was a person beyond reproach, I should sign up for the program whereby members of the public can go on patrol with a police officer. Funnily enough, I was aware of the scheme and it had crossed my mind to find out the details just a few days earlier.

I asked the obvious question regarding what would happen if a major and deadly incident occurred. The police officer replied that we would probably stay a little further back than other responding officers. She also said that all police officers carry a second weapon and that she would make that available to me in case she got shot and I needed to defend myself. That was kind of a chilling thought. I guess it really is a jungle out there.

B&W conversions in Silver Efex Pro.

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